driff1801: Delbecq/Dijkstra/Hollenbeck: Linger

driff1801: Delbecq/Dijkstra/Hollenbeck: Linger
Label: Driff Records
Catalog Number: driff1801
Availability: In Stock
Price: €16.50
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Benoît Delbecq - prepared piano, bass synth 
Jorrit Dijkstra - alto saxophone, lyricon, analog electronics 
John Hollenbeck – drums, percussion 
 
1. Place 05:23
2. Relay 06:21
3. Linger 04:08
4. Stir 03:46
5. Hold 08:54
6. Stalk 05:37
7. Push 04:19
8. Poke 03:50
9. Dwell 04:58
10. Edge 04:57
 
Driff Records 1801 
www.driffrecords.com
credits
released October 1, 2018 
 
Benoît Delbecq - prepared piano, bass synth 
Jorrit Dijkstra - alto saxophone, lyricon, analog electronics 
John Hollenbeck – drums, percussion 
 
All improvisations by Benoît Delbecq (SACEM), Jorrit Dijkstra (Buma/Stemra) and John Hollenbeck (ASCAP/GEMA). 
 
Recorded by Eric Kilburn at Wellspring Studio, Acton MA on January 24, 2016. Mixed by Benoît Delbecq and Steve Argüelles at PlushSpace, Paris. Mastered by Myles Boisen at Headless Buddha Mastering Lab, Oakland CA. Cover art by Raoul van der Weide. Design by Hidde Dijkstra. 
Photography by Valérie Archeno. 
 
www.delbecq.net 
www.jorritdijkstra.com 
www.johnhollenbeck.com 
 
Dijkstra and Hollenbeck have been collaborating as a duo since the mid-nineties. Recorded as a follow-up on their well-received album Sequence (Trytone Records, 2005), Linger adds French prepared piano master Benoît Delbecq to the mix. Dijkstra and Delbecq met at the Banff Jazz Workshop in 1990 and have collaborated occasionally over the years. As on Sequence, the same process of instant composition was used in the studio: to establish some textures and atmospheres first, then record a few takes per texture, and choose the best takes afterwards without further editing. The titles of the ten tracks all reflect movement of some sort, represented by the multi-layered rhythms, the dense microtonal textures, and the lyrical, lingering melodic interactions of Dijkstra and Delbecq. Delbecq’s mumbling bass synth lines, Dijkstra’s analog synth and processed saxophone sounds, and Hollenbeck’s hard-hitting grooves and almost electronic-sounding percussions give the album a unique sound that defies categories.