ERR10: Baars/Kneer: Windfall.

ERR10: Baars/Kneer: Windfall.
ERR10: Baars/Kneer: Windfall.
Label: Evil Rabbit Records
Catalog Number: ERR10
Availability: In Stock
Price: €14.50
Qty:  

Ab Baars tenor saxophone, clarinet, shakuhachi, noh-kan 
Meinrad Kneer double bass 

1 The Staircase Incident 4:19 
2 Ant Logics 2:45 
3 Windfall 1:53 
4 Wood-Wind 4:55 
5 Long Way Home 4:30 
6 Bird Talk 5:01 
7 Insinuated Instability 3:54 
8 The Pledge 6:41 
9 Eastern Rudiment 3:13 
10 Into Philosophy 4:05 
11 Target Practice 4:50 

Total playing time: 46:07 
Recorded by Albert van Veenendaal, january 24 and december 1, 2008 at Bethaniënklooster, Amsterdam 
mixed and mastered by micha de kanter 
All compositions by Baars / Kneer, ©BUMA 
Design: Lysander le Coultre (Strangelove Creatives) 
Photography: Monique Besten 
Special thanks to Micha de Kanter, Jack Lina and Bethaniënklooster

Reed player ab baars is part of the second generation of dutch free improvisers and has been a member of the icp orchestra for over 25 years. An accomplished tenor saxophonist and clarinetist (who has recently added the shakuhachi to his arsenal), he’s an improviser of intelligence who never takes the easy route. He’s as comfortable with free improvisation as he is with interpreting the music of duke ellington or john carter. For windfall he is joined by bassist meinrad kneer, one of the younger players on the dutch jazz scene (though german-born), in a series of improvised duets. In this format, one gets to hear baars up close and personal and beautifully recorded. The tenor/ bass pieces (6 out of 11 tracks) are standouts, but that’s not to minimize the remaining tracks. On the tenor duets, his horn blows with an aylerian blend of intensity and pathos but the sound is uniquely baars’. He’s well-matched by kneer, who plays all over his instrument, eliciting all manner of complementary sounds: scrapes, rumbling growls, high-end harmonics, deep resonant plucked strings. This is a satisfying set of duets worth hearing by any follower of improvised music. Robert Iannapollo, signal to noise #58, summer 2010

+++

For fans of free improvisation, here is another great sax-bass duo album, with dutchman ab baars on reeds and german meinrad kneer on bass. The album brings you eleven tracks of relatively accessible jazz with each piece having its own musical dynamics, sound and development, created out of nothing more than excellent listening skills and anticipation, the result of having played together a lot. Yet the most astonishing aspect is the emotional depth that is the exclusive of improvised music, but certainly never guaranteed. Listen to "the pledge", which gradually evolves from slow and somewhat joyful playing of sax and arco bass into a straining, haunting repetition around a single tonal center. Baars's influences stretch from monk over the art ensemble of chicago to butch morris, with whom he played, with the additional eastern element and shakuhachi playing, as on "bird talk" or "eastern rudiment". Although born and educated in germany, kneer is very active in the netherlands, and his playing is indebted to greats such as peter kowald (the physicality) and barry guy (the creative irreverence). Together, they meander between form and abstraction, full of assent and dissent, dissonance and echoing, yet the true power lies in the almost endless variation of timbre in which the dialogue takes place, adding an almost voice-like inflection and subtlety. Despite their freedom of approach, they deal with it in a very mature way : they are beyond the deconstruction phase : there is no shouting, there is no shock element : the music almost arises organically out of spontaneous sounds, and built upon through creative interaction. In sum, two artists who understand music, have journeyed deep and far to know what works and what doesn't, and use all the constraints and possibilities of the duo format to bring a very varied, coherent, adventurous and intense album. A joy for the open ear. Stef, 16 august 2010, free jazz

+++

Ab baars on tenor sax, clarinet, shakuhachi & noh-kan (transverse flute) and meinrad kneer on double bass. Ab baars is a longtime member of the icp orchestra as well as leading his own trio & duos plus collaborating with ig henneman, michael moore and the ex. Bassist meinrad kneer can be found one at least three other discs on this, the evil rabbit label playing in a great duo with albert van veenendaal and in playstation 6. These are all improvised duos and i was knocked out by the depth of expression and inspired dialogue of both musicians. The both bowed bass and tenor sax, clarinet or wooden flutes all have a similar range and often sound perfect together weaving their voices and ideas into a dynamic exchange. The shakuhachi and acoustic bass on "insinuated instability" sound especially sublime, slowly caressing each other's poignant touch & tone. Each of the eleven pieces here have a way of presenting a thoughtful and refreshing dialogue between two most impressive musicians. I recently heard & reviewed the third disc from the van veenendaal/kneer duo with guests and was blown away by it, which is amazing since i hadn't heard of either musician before. This is yet another extraordinary duo. Bruce Lee Gallanter, 13 august 2010, downtown music gallery new york

+++

Baars, whose best-known affiliation is with the ICP Orchestra, brings his tenor saxophone, clarinet, shakuhachi and noh-kan to the session. Windfall demonstrates that this timbral collection didn’t faze Kneer. Versatility is his watchword. Although Kneer often records with prepared pianist Albert Van Veenendaal, he also works frequently with Jazz-Folk-Rocker guitarist Paul Pallesen and other leading lights of the Netherlands’ improv scene as saxophonist Tobias Delius. One instance of the Baars/Kneer concordance occurs on “Bird Talk”, which links the bassist’s distanced creaks and shuffle bowing with shrill whistling and intermittent, high-pitched twitters with an Oriental cast, likely produced by Baars’ noh kan or bamboo transverse flute. By the piece's completion, the reedist’s biting shrills are matched by the bassist’s spiccato scrubs.

Similar strategies arise on tunes using more conventional instruments such as tenor saxophone on “The Pledge” and clarinet on “Insinuated Instability”. On the first, Baars’ initial flat-line undulations ascend to continuous harsh reed blasts as Kneer crunches and scratches andante lines – his stretched tessitura unperturbed by the saxophonist’s concentrated atonality. As a matter of fact, when Baars produces double, triple and quadruple variations on certain note clusters, Kneer does the same by using bow motions and concluding passages that are both legato and basso. On the latter tune it’s Baars’ moderato clarinet lines which have to catch up, as the bassist’s finger-style accompaniment blossoms first with strums and twangs and then with sawing, crackling, single-note resonation. Downshifting to a gentler output as he solos, the clarinetist manages to interest Kneer in what could be baroque inventions, ending the piece with warm, near pastoral counterpoint.

In truth, the most effective duets involve Baars’ tenor, including “The Staircase Incident”, where between Kneer’s thick string-stopping and the reedist’s jagged and harsh cries, it sounds as if the two – without drums and piano – are attempting a Monk quartet emulation, with the reeedist’s Charlie Rouse-styled lines responding to the unheard other members’ contributions.

Elsewhere the saxophonist can accelerate to Aylerian heights, piling great gouts of notes and extensions into every breath, featuring tongue stops as well as sudden leaps into the altissimo register, while the bassist bows muscularly alongside him. Other tunes suggest the distinctive textures British reeedist Evan Parker brings to tongue flutters and growling cries. But the Dutch players output is more measured, a contrast to the circular breathing of the British saxophonist. Baars’ change of pace is likely the result of the pitch-slides, slaps and col legno undercurrents from the bassist which ground and centre the other’s improvisations.

Ken Waxman, Jazzword

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Ab Baars tenor saxophone, clarinet, shakuhachi, noh-kan 
Meinrad Kneer double bass 

1 The Staircase Incident 4:19 
2 Ant Logics 2:45 
3 Windfall 1:53 
4 Wood-Wind 4:55 
5 Long Way Home 4:30 
6 Bird Talk 5:01 
7 Insinuated Instability 3:54 
8 The Pledge 6:41 
9 Eastern Rudiment 3:13 
10 Into Philosophy 4:05 
11 Target Practice 4:50 

Total playing time: 46:07 
Recorded by Albert van Veenendaal, january 24 and december 1, 2008 at Bethaniënklooster, Amsterdam 
mixed and mastered by micha de kanter 
All compositions by Baars / Kneer, ©BUMA 
Design: Lysander le Coultre (Strangelove Creatives) 
Photography: Monique Besten 
Special thanks to Micha de Kanter, Jack Lina and Bethaniënklooster

 


Reed player ab baars is part of the second generation of dutch free improvisers and has been a member of the icp orchestra for over 25 years. An accomplished tenor saxophonist and clarinetist (who has recently added the shakuhachi to his arsenal), he’s an improviser of intelligence who never takes the easy route. He’s as comfortable with free improvisation as he is with interpreting the music of duke ellington or john carter. For windfall he is joined by bassist meinrad kneer, one of the younger players on the dutch jazz scene (though german-born), in a series of improvised duets. In this format, one gets to hear baars up close and personal and beautifully recorded. The tenor/ bass pieces (6 out of 11 tracks) are standouts, but that’s not to minimize the remaining tracks. On the tenor duets, his horn blows with an aylerian blend of intensity and pathos but the sound is uniquely baars’. He’s well-matched by kneer, who plays all over his instrument, eliciting all manner of complementary sounds: scrapes, rumbling growls, high-end harmonics, deep resonant plucked strings. This is a satisfying set of duets worth hearing by any follower of improvised music. Robert Iannapollo, signal to noise #58, summer 2010

+++

For fans of free improvisation, here is another great sax-bass duo album, with dutchman ab baars on reeds and german meinrad kneer on bass. The album brings you eleven tracks of relatively accessible jazz with each piece having its own musical dynamics, sound and development, created out of nothing more than excellent listening skills and anticipation, the result of having played together a lot. Yet the most astonishing aspect is the emotional depth that is the exclusive of improvised music, but certainly never guaranteed. Listen to "the pledge", which gradually evolves from slow and somewhat joyful playing of sax and arco bass into a straining, haunting repetition around a single tonal center. Baars's influences stretch from monk over the art ensemble of chicago to butch morris, with whom he played, with the additional eastern element and shakuhachi playing, as on "bird talk" or "eastern rudiment". Although born and educated in germany, kneer is very active in the netherlands, and his playing is indebted to greats such as peter kowald (the physicality) and barry guy (the creative irreverence). Together, they meander between form and abstraction, full of assent and dissent, dissonance and echoing, yet the true power lies in the almost endless variation of timbre in which the dialogue takes place, adding an almost voice-like inflection and subtlety. Despite their freedom of approach, they deal with it in a very mature way : they are beyond the deconstruction phase : there is no shouting, there is no shock element : the music almost arises organically out of spontaneous sounds, and built upon through creative interaction. In sum, two artists who understand music, have journeyed deep and far to know what works and what doesn't, and use all the constraints and possibilities of the duo format to bring a very varied, coherent, adventurous and intense album. A joy for the open ear. Stef, 16 august 2010, free jazz

+++

Ab baars on tenor sax, clarinet, shakuhachi & noh-kan (transverse flute) and meinrad kneer on double bass. Ab baars is a longtime member of the icp orchestra as well as leading his own trio & duos plus collaborating with ig henneman, michael moore and the ex. Bassist meinrad kneer can be found one at least three other discs on this, the evil rabbit label playing in a great duo with albert van veenendaal and in playstation 6. These are all improvised duos and i was knocked out by the depth of expression and inspired dialogue of both musicians. The both bowed bass and tenor sax, clarinet or wooden flutes all have a similar range and often sound perfect together weaving their voices and ideas into a dynamic exchange. The shakuhachi and acoustic bass on "insinuated instability" sound especially sublime, slowly caressing each other's poignant touch & tone. Each of the eleven pieces here have a way of presenting a thoughtful and refreshing dialogue between two most impressive musicians. I recently heard & reviewed the third disc from the van veenendaal/kneer duo with guests and was blown away by it, which is amazing since i hadn't heard of either musician before. This is yet another extraordinary duo. Bruce Lee Gallanter, 13 august 2010, downtown music gallery new york

+++

Baars, whose best-known affiliation is with the ICP Orchestra, brings his tenor saxophone, clarinet, shakuhachi and noh-kan to the session. Windfall demonstrates that this timbral collection didn’t faze Kneer. Versatility is his watchword. Although Kneer often records with prepared pianist Albert Van Veenendaal, he also works frequently with Jazz-Folk-Rocker guitarist Paul Pallesen and other leading lights of the Netherlands’ improv scene as saxophonist Tobias Delius. One instance of the Baars/Kneer concordance occurs on “Bird Talk”, which links the bassist’s distanced creaks and shuffle bowing with shrill whistling and intermittent, high-pitched twitters with an Oriental cast, likely produced by Baars’ noh kan or bamboo transverse flute. By the piece's completion, the reedist’s biting shrills are matched by the bassist’s spiccato scrubs.

Similar strategies arise on tunes using more conventional instruments such as tenor saxophone on “The Pledge” and clarinet on “Insinuated Instability”. On the first, Baars’ initial flat-line undulations ascend to continuous harsh reed blasts as Kneer crunches and scratches andante lines – his stretched tessitura unperturbed by the saxophonist’s concentrated atonality. As a matter of fact, when Baars produces double, triple and quadruple variations on certain note clusters, Kneer does the same by using bow motions and concluding passages that are both legato and basso. On the latter tune it’s Baars’ moderato clarinet lines which have to catch up, as the bassist’s finger-style accompaniment blossoms first with strums and twangs and then with sawing, crackling, single-note resonation. Downshifting to a gentler output as he solos, the clarinetist manages to interest Kneer in what could be baroque inventions, ending the piece with warm, near pastoral counterpoint.

In truth, the most effective duets involve Baars’ tenor, including “The Staircase Incident”, where between Kneer’s thick string-stopping and the reedist’s jagged and harsh cries, it sounds as if the two – without drums and piano – are attempting a Monk quartet emulation, with the reeedist’s Charlie Rouse-styled lines responding to the unheard other members’ contributions.

Elsewhere the saxophonist can accelerate to Aylerian heights, piling great gouts of notes and extensions into every breath, featuring tongue stops as well as sudden leaps into the altissimo register, while the bassist bows muscularly alongside him. Other tunes suggest the distinctive textures British reeedist Evan Parker brings to tongue flutters and growling cries. But the Dutch players output is more measured, a contrast to the circular breathing of the British saxophonist. Baars’ change of pace is likely the result of the pitch-slides, slaps and col legno undercurrents from the bassist which ground and centre the other’s improvisations.

Ken Waxman, Jazzword

 Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure!

 Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure!
  
Ab Baars tenor saxophone, clarinet, shakuhachi, noh-kan 
Meinrad Kneer double bass 

1 The Staircase Incident 4:19 
2 Ant Logics 2:45 
3 Windfall 1:53 
4 Wood-Wind 4:55 
5 Long Way Home 4:30 
6 Bird Talk 5:01 
7 Insinuated Instability 3:54 
8 The Pledge 6:41 
9 Eastern Rudiment 3:13 
10 Into Philosophy 4:05 
11 Target Practice 4:50 

Total playing time: 46:07 
Recorded by Albert van Veenendaal, january 24 and december 1, 2008 at Bethaniënklooster, Amsterdam 
mixed and mastered by micha de kanter 
All compositions by Baars / Kneer, ©BUMA 
Design: Lysander le Coultre (Strangelove Creatives) 
Photography: Monique Besten 
Special thanks to Micha de Kanter, Jack Lina and Bethaniënklooster


Reed player ab baars is part of the second generation of dutch free improvisers and has been a member of the icp orchestra for over 25 years. An accomplished tenor saxophonist and clarinetist (who has recently added the shakuhachi to his arsenal), he’s an improviser of intelligence who never takes the easy route. He’s as comfortable with free improvisation as he is with interpreting the music of duke ellington or john carter. For windfall he is joined by bassist meinrad kneer, one of the younger players on the dutch jazz scene (though german-born), in a series of improvised duets. In this format, one gets to hear baars up close and personal and beautifully recorded. The tenor/ bass pieces (6 out of 11 tracks) are standouts, but that’s not to minimize the remaining tracks. On the tenor duets, his horn blows with an aylerian blend of intensity and pathos but the sound is uniquely baars’. He’s well-matched by kneer, who plays all over his instrument, eliciting all manner of complementary sounds: scrapes, rumbling growls, high-end harmonics, deep resonant plucked strings. This is a satisfying set of duets worth hearing by any follower of improvised music. Robert Iannapollo, signal to noise #58, summer 2010

+++

For fans of free improvisation, here is another great sax-bass duo album, with dutchman ab baars on reeds and german meinrad kneer on bass. The album brings you eleven tracks of relatively accessible jazz with each piece having its own musical dynamics, sound and development, created out of nothing more than excellent listening skills and anticipation, the result of having played together a lot. Yet the most astonishing aspect is the emotional depth that is the exclusive of improvised music, but certainly never guaranteed. Listen to "the pledge", which gradually evolves from slow and somewhat joyful playing of sax and arco bass into a straining, haunting repetition around a single tonal center. Baars's influences stretch from monk over the art ensemble of chicago to butch morris, with whom he played, with the additional eastern element and shakuhachi playing, as on "bird talk" or "eastern rudiment". Although born and educated in germany, kneer is very active in the netherlands, and his playing is indebted to greats such as peter kowald (the physicality) and barry guy (the creative irreverence). Together, they meander between form and abstraction, full of assent and dissent, dissonance and echoing, yet the true power lies in the almost endless variation of timbre in which the dialogue takes place, adding an almost voice-like inflection and subtlety. Despite their freedom of approach, they deal with it in a very mature way : they are beyond the deconstruction phase : there is no shouting, there is no shock element : the music almost arises organically out of spontaneous sounds, and built upon through creative interaction. In sum, two artists who understand music, have journeyed deep and far to know what works and what doesn't, and use all the constraints and possibilities of the duo format to bring a very varied, coherent, adventurous and intense album. A joy for the open ear. Stef, 16 august 2010, free jazz

+++

Ab baars on tenor sax, clarinet, shakuhachi & noh-kan (transverse flute) and meinrad kneer on double bass. Ab baars is a longtime member of the icp orchestra as well as leading his own trio & duos plus collaborating with ig henneman, michael moore and the ex. Bassist meinrad kneer can be found one at least three other discs on this, the evil rabbit label playing in a great duo with albert van veenendaal and in playstation 6. These are all improvised duos and i was knocked out by the depth of expression and inspired dialogue of both musicians. The both bowed bass and tenor sax, clarinet or wooden flutes all have a similar range and often sound perfect together weaving their voices and ideas into a dynamic exchange. The shakuhachi and acoustic bass on "insinuated instability" sound especially sublime, slowly caressing each other's poignant touch & tone. Each of the eleven pieces here have a way of presenting a thoughtful and refreshing dialogue between two most impressive musicians. I recently heard & reviewed the third disc from the van veenendaal/kneer duo with guests and was blown away by it, which is amazing since i hadn't heard of either musician before. This is yet another extraordinary duo. Bruce Lee Gallanter, 13 august 2010, downtown music gallery new york

+++

Baars, whose best-known affiliation is with the ICP Orchestra, brings his tenor saxophone, clarinet, shakuhachi and noh-kan to the session. Windfall demonstrates that this timbral collection didn’t faze Kneer. Versatility is his watchword. Although Kneer often records with prepared pianist Albert Van Veenendaal, he also works frequently with Jazz-Folk-Rocker guitarist Paul Pallesen and other leading lights of the Netherlands’ improv scene as saxophonist Tobias Delius. One instance of the Baars/Kneer concordance occurs on “Bird Talk”, which links the bassist’s distanced creaks and shuffle bowing with shrill whistling and intermittent, high-pitched twitters with an Oriental cast, likely produced by Baars’ noh kan or bamboo transverse flute. By the piece's completion, the reedist’s biting shrills are matched by the bassist’s spiccato scrubs.

Similar strategies arise on tunes using more conventional instruments such as tenor saxophone on “The Pledge” and clarinet on “Insinuated Instability”. On the first, Baars’ initial flat-line undulations ascend to continuous harsh reed blasts as Kneer crunches and scratches andante lines – his stretched tessitura unperturbed by the saxophonist’s concentrated atonality. As a matter of fact, when Baars produces double, triple and quadruple variations on certain note clusters, Kneer does the same by using bow motions and concluding passages that are both legato and basso. On the latter tune it’s Baars’ moderato clarinet lines which have to catch up, as the bassist’s finger-style accompaniment blossoms first with strums and twangs and then with sawing, crackling, single-note resonation. Downshifting to a gentler output as he solos, the clarinetist manages to interest Kneer in what could be baroque inventions, ending the piece with warm, near pastoral counterpoint.

In truth, the most effective duets involve Baars’ tenor, including “The Staircase Incident”, where between Kneer’s thick string-stopping and the reedist’s jagged and harsh cries, it sounds as if the two – without drums and piano – are attempting a Monk quartet emulation, with the reeedist’s Charlie Rouse-styled lines responding to the unheard other members’ contributions.

Elsewhere the saxophonist can accelerate to Aylerian heights, piling great gouts of notes and extensions into every breath, featuring tongue stops as well as sudden leaps into the altissimo register, while the bassist bows muscularly alongside him. Other tunes suggest the distinctive textures British reeedist Evan Parker brings to tongue flutters and growling cries. But the Dutch players output is more measured, a contrast to the circular breathing of the British saxophonist. Baars’ change of pace is likely the result of the pitch-slides, slaps and col legno undercurrents from the bassist which ground and centre the other’s improvisations.

Ken Waxman, Jazzword